Why information processing should be considered sacred

With the internet enjoying its youth, man has decided to exploit the platform to safe guard the most precious element of human existence; information. Information, in any form, no matter how small, is the basis of human advancement.

An apple fell on Isaac Newton’s head and he decided to investigate the incident, after he processed his thoughts, he deciphered and penned the information to substantiate his Law of Gravity for fellow physicists and mathematicians to verify. Professional information processors such as lecturers and journalists needed to take this complex phenomenon and process it even further for us mere mortals to understand.

Simply put, information processing is the act of taking information and presenting it in a manner that is understandable to the receiver. If you have ever explained a concept to a person by accurately simplifying it, you served as an information processor.

But who safeguards the accuracy of this information? Those who feel ethically and morally compelled to do so, that’s who. Surely, there are professions that are focussed on information processing such as media practitioners and academics but everyone can be a legitimate information processor. This requires hard work, though. You must be clued up on a specific matter.

With the rise of the internet, we all have access to information. We have the explanation to all discoveries in various media, in the palm of our hands or printed on paper. It is how you interpret this information that makes a difference to wide-spread human ignorance. Should you decide to take on the role of a teacher, even for a brief moment in casual discussion or debate, be sure to actually know what you are talking about. If you’re not educated on a matter, take out your phone and consult the internet for the most credible source to answer your query.

You will be respected more for acknowledging your shortage of information than rambling on about an issue you know nothing about. We are not walking encyclopedias, but we do have the responsibility of keeping information accurate in actual encyclopedias. A truly interesting story will be told a thousand times over, even if it is factually all wrong. Cleopatra wasn’t Egyptian and Frankenstein is not the monster, but the creator.

Be sure to cross reference and check facts after you’ve heard an interesting piece of information. This way you will have an interesting story and always secure your credibility as a skilled information processor. And it definitely makes you ponder; did an apple really fall on Newton’s head?

Don’t trust everything you hear or read. Make sure you collect information from credible sources of content.